Disconnected ramblings about software development, iOS, FreeBSD, anti-social networking, kittens, drosophilidae, small business, Android, web services, finches, Windows, electrical engineering, XML, rental cars, rye, or ... FIVE dollars??!... something something beer.

Xmas List

Tags: 

How to add a tab to a Table of Figures in Word

You have a Table of Figures in word and the descriptions do not line up, and some of the lines wrap. Since there isn't a tab after the figure/table number, lines do not wrap correctly.

There isn't a way to do this by setting a format when you create the table. You have to start when you are creating each of the captions.

You have to add a tab in each caption e.g. Figure 23:<tab>A photo of a kitten.

Then once you build your table you can set up tabs for the style used in your Table of Figures.

We miss you so much, Maggie.

We never expected to lose you so soon.

You are sweet and gentle and kind; quiet, but ready to give a non-intrusive tap on the shoulder when you need a pat or fell left out.

I know you often felt stressed out, but I hope you enjoyed spending the last eight years with us.

Xamarin Certified Mobile Developer

I took my exam yesterday. If you know anyone who needs cross-platform mobile apps, let them know that you know a Xamarin Certified Mobile Developer.

Tags: 

No, I didn't mean tampons.

Tags: 

How to use ActivStats for Data Desk with Minitab

So you are taking a statistics course, and the textbook includes a DVD-ROM with ActiveStats for Data Desk, but the course requires you to purchase ActiveStats for Minitab.

The bad news is that ActiveStats for Minitab will cost you another 60 bucks or more.

The good news is that Minitab is an excellent statistics package and it is way better than Data Desk; and if you're willing to make a tiny effort, you don't need to buy ActiveStats for Minitab.

What we are going to do is let ActiveStats open data sets in Data Desk, and then copy-and-paste them into Minitab.

There are two circumstances you will need to do this.

  1. An instructional exercise asks you to plot or analyze something.
  2. A homework assignment asks you to plot or analyze something.

They both work the same way. Let's look at an example.

For every exercise in ActiveStats for Data Desk, there is an equivalent one in ActiveStats for Minitab. They are not always named the same thing, but they are otherwise identical.

In chapter 7-4, there is an exercise called Examine Mortality and Education Using Data Desk. We'll do it in Minitab.


If we click the icon, the exercise is opened in Data Desk.

One of the little windows contains the data set. Select the each of the data columns by holding down shift while clicking each one. Ignore the once called Reference.

Now copy these by pressing Ctrl-C or Edit|Copy Variables. You will be asked if you want the variable names in the first row. Click Yes.

Now fire up Minitab with an empty project. Position the cursor by clicking in the grey cell that is one over and one down. Press Ctrl-V or Edit|Paste Cells. Poof! There is your data set.

Now all you need to do is complete the exercise in Minitab. You may need to use your brain to find the equivalent function in Minitab for each in Data Desk, but they are both statistics software and the terminology is similar or identical.

For this exercise we need to calculate the Pearson Product-Moment correlation, and plot a Scatterplot. Hmmm... I bet Scatterplot is under the Graphs menu... yup. And correlation?

Found it!

Enjoy learning about statistics and sticking it to the man. If this article saved you $60, please consider donating $10 or more to the Guelph Humane Society. The pups and kitties will be grateful.

Server error: '501 5.1.3 Bad recipient address syntax'

A user of my mail server recently had some recipients of a message returned. He received this message from my server.

The following recipient(s) cannot be reached:

       'redacted@civ.utoronto.ca' on 8/20/2014 10:35 AM
             Server error: '501 5.1.3 Bad recipient address syntax'

       'redacted@wlu.ca' on 8/20/2014 10:35 AM
Server error: '501 5.1.3 Bad recipient address syntax' 'redacted@uoguelph.ca' on 8/20/2014 10:35 AM
Server error: '501 5.1.3 Bad recipient address syntax' 'redacted@uoguelph.ca' on 8/20/2014 10:35 AM
Server error: '501 5.1.3 Bad recipient address syntax' 'redacted@eng.uwo.ca' on 8/20/2014 10:35 AM
Server error: '501 5.1.3 Bad recipient address syntax'

The other recipients were delivered successfully. On the server-side, Postfix logged:

Aug 20 14:35:17 darwin postfix/smtpd[63431]: warning: Illegal address syntax from 
or087.uwaterloo.ca[129.97.9.53] in RCPT command: <'redacted@uwo.ca'>
Aug 20 14:35:17 darwin postfix/smtpd[63431]: warning: Illegal address syntax from
or087.uwaterloo.ca[129.97.9.53] in RCPT command: <'
redacted@wlu.ca'>
Aug 20 14:35:17 darwin postfix/smtpd[63431]: warning: Illegal address syntax from
or087.uwaterloo.ca[129.97.9.53] in RCPT command: <'
redacted@eng.uwo.ca'>
Aug 20 14:35:17 darwin postfix/smtpd[63431]: warning: Illegal address syntax from
or087.uwaterloo.ca[129.97.9.53] in RCPT command: <'
redacted@grandriver.ca'>

The problem is that these particular addresses were literally enclosed by apostrophes. I don't know why the user's client (Outlook) misformatted these addresses. He confirmed that he did not copy them from another application or change anything at his end.

To fix the problem I configured Postfix to filter and rewrite the address when it is sending commands to other MTAs.

I added to main.cf:

# Strange filtering
smtpd_command_filter = pcre:/usr/local/etc/postfix/command_filter
and created the file command_filter:
# Fix malformed emails that are surrounded in single quotes.
/^RCPT\s+TO:\s*<'([^[:space:]]+)'>(.*)/     RCPT TO:<$1>$2

This fixed this oddity in which RCPT TO commands were not RFC 821-compliant.

Pages

Simple Copyright Policy: If you want to reproduce anything on this site, get my permission first.